Filtering by: In the Press

Volga on National Geographic
Jul
13
to Aug 1

Volga on National Geographic

"Russia’s mighty Volga river stretches 2,193 miles (3,530 kilometers) from the northwest of Moscow down to the Caspian Sea in the south. It’s the country’s principle waterway and the historic cradle of the entire state. Along Volga’s banks, Ivan the Terrible began Russia’s expansion during the 16th century, the Battle of Stalingrad claimed over 1.5 million lives in Volgograd in the early 1940s, and Vladimir Lenin was born in 1870 in Ulyanovsk. And now, in 2018, four cities along this monumental stretch of water will host World Cupmatches.

While football fever may have consumed large parts of Russia during the tournament, Italian photographer Davide Monteleone, who spent 10 days exploring cities and towns along the Volga during the event, was most interested in the region’s deep-rooted culture and customs."  

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The April Theses at the Davidson College Art Gallery
Aug
31
to Oct 8

The April Theses at the Davidson College Art Gallery

One hundred years after the Russian Revolution, Lenin Lives, co-curated by Lia Newman, Gallery Director/Curator, and Roman Utkin, Assistant Professor of Russian Studies, explores the afterlife of one of the most enduring and spectacular personality cults of modern history – the worship of the first Soviet leader, Vladimir Ilyich Ulyanov – Lenin (1870-1924). As the myth of the immortal Lenin developed, the image of the Revolution’s iconic leader became, not ironically, larger than life. For the rest of the tumultuous twentieth century, Lenin came to embody the idea of communism and the Revolution itself.

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Spasibo Shortlisted  at Paris Photo
Nov
14
1:00 PM13:00

Spasibo Shortlisted at Paris Photo

"Spasibo" starts with a bang: an official fireworks display celebrating Chechnya’s Constitution Day in the capital, Grozny. The charade continues with photographs of well-heeled couples in a newly constructed square; sunlight glints off skyscrapers and black SUVs. But Davide Monteleone, a runner-up for the 2014 Aperture Portfolio Prize and winner of the 2011 European Publishers Award, quickly bypasses officially sanctioned narratives. He captures the anxieties of a persecuted culture at odds with Russia and itself: its newly politicized religiosity and accompanying misogyny, its disabled veterans, and the omnipresent visage of its Putin-vetted president, Ramzan Kadyrov. “This book stands out for its narrative sequencing and the intensity of the printing,” says Julien Frydman. “Despite being relatively classic in form, small design touches—including short-trimmed, sage-colored pages on which historical, personal photos appear, and a gorgeous silk-screened cloth cover—give this book extra impact".
 

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